Research-based
policy recommendations
for the G7

Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER)

Established in August 1981, ICRIER is a policy-oriented, not-for-profit, economic policy think tank. ICRIER’s main focus is to enhance the knowledge content of policy making by undertaking analytical research that is targeted at informing India’s policy makers and also at improving the interface with the global economy.

ICRIER has two office locations in Delhi; in the institutional complex of India Habitat Centre and a new office at the Institutional Area, Sector 6, Pushp Vihar, New Delhi.

ICRIER’s Board of Governors includes leading academicians, policymakers, and representatives from the private sector. Mr Pramod Bhasin is ICRIER’s chairperson and Dr Deepak Mishra is Director & Chief Executive.

ICRIER conducts thematic research in the following five thrust areas:

  • Growth, Employment and Macroeconomics (GEM)
  • Trade, Investment and External Relations (TIER)
  • Agriculture Policy, Sustainability and Innovation (APSI)
  • Digital Economy, Start-ups and Innovation (DESI)
  • Climate Change, Urbanization and Sustainability (CCUS)

To effectively disseminate research findings, ICRIER organises workshops, seminars and conferences to bring together academicians, policymakers, representatives from industry and media to create a more informed understanding on issues of major policy interest. ICRIER routinely invites distinguished scholars and policymakers from around the world to deliver public lectures and give seminars on economic themes of interest to contemporary India.

Publications

Research, Evidence and Learning – The Need for a Global Infrastructure

Covid-19 has put the lives of millions of people at risk, creating uncertainties and heightening existing fragilities, particularly where social inequities and inequalities are most pronounced. Global health requires equitable, inclusive responses, informed by research, data and evidence. Existing global health research infrastructure is afflicted by weak institutional mechanisms and perpetuation of evidence hierarchies and silos and excludes and devalues different knowledges and lived experience. Major challenges include unevenness of financial support to global health research, evidence generation, and learning, policy engagement with too narrow a range of evidence; and insufficient investment in infrastructure for promoting international learning and exchange of health-related knowledge, evidence and data. Recommendations for action by G7 members to address these challenges include: (1) a jointly negotiated quota of 0.5% of G7 members’ national GDP for R&D funds administered through multilateral channels; (2) establishing a centralized health research clearing-house with joint governance for communication and action; (3) establishment of Pandemic Centres of Excellence  in all world regions providing collaborative, regional mechanisms for medical research, social science research relevant to health, and vaccine production, distribution and delivery; (4) support to collaborative research networks that represent different forms of knowledge and experience, and use a diversity of research approaches and methodologies; and (5) investment in adaptive, agile national and regional systems for monitoring, early warning, and crisis preparedness, underpinned by open data and digital utilities. The paper also offers practical suggestions for implementing these recommendations in the short, mid and longer term, including G7 members working jointly with the UN, G20 and other international actors to join a global call for a 2023-2032 UN Decade for Health Research.

Logo: ICRIER

Details

City New Delhi
Country India
Email
Website